A week’s leave!

TELEGRAM dated 14 Oct 17
HYDE HIGHCROFT MINCHINHAMPTON =
AM ENJOYING WEEKS LEAVE CAIRO
GOODLAND =

Sent as weekend telegram, via Eastern Telegraph Company Limited

14/10/17
Turf Club. Cairo

My dear old Elsie
I am enjoying a weeks leave in Cairo and its a really delightful experience after nearly six months of Desert life.
I sent you a wire so that you would know that I am out of range of the shells & bullets for a time and I know you would realize that I’m having a real good time.
Milsom is here with me and we are doing ourselves just proud and tucking in like school boys to all the good things one cant get up in the fighting area –  like butter – fish –  fruit. We’ve got a big double room at the famous Shepheards Hotel1 and its got its own bathroom with one of those white enamel baths & of course we spend hours in the water and it’s such a joy to feel really clean again. I found out Karl Jones2 yesterday and he is coming in to lunch with me this morning and we are going to a most wonderful Zoo later on. Karl looks very well and no one would imagine he has been in hospital nearly six months and I think it will be a long time before he can do any marching or hard soldiering for the muscles of one of his thighs are quite perished a[t] present but he is now passed B3 and will get some clerical job I expect until he gets quite strong. The Regiment came out of the line just before I left but goes back in a day or two – a month in and six days out – it’s very wearying work and I long for it all to be over.

Dear girl – you will be pleased to hear that the Regiment got such a lot of kudos out of the Night Raid and did I tell you the C-in-C sent a special wire of congratulation!3 I dream about that night still and I think those of us who were in it will never forget our experiences. I wrote home a long letter to the Pater with a fairly full account of it all but I’m rather afraid the censor will destroy it – I shall be [interested?] to hear if it ever fetches up. We certainly put the fear of God into the old Turk that night and he simply screamed for mercy –  Allah! Allah! I can hear them now. When I get back I take over the duties of Adjutant – my appointment has been approved by Headquarters from Oct 10th so now I shall have my hands full. I am looking forward to finding letters from you when I rejoin for it seems some time ago since the last mail came – something went wrong with our mails back in August & early Septbr every one was grousing at home but I hope my letters have reached you better lately.
I hope Mrs. Brown is much better now and that you dear girl are keeping fit – with best love
from Stan

1 Then and for many years the leading hotel in Cairo. It was burnt down during the anti-British riots at the time of the Suez Crisis in 1956. En Suite facilities were only to be found in exclusive hotels in 1917.
2 Karl Jones, engaged to Stanley’s youngest sister, Babe, served with the Glamorgan Yeomanry. Invalided from Palestine to Egypt, he later became Chief Cipher Officer, HQ EEF Cairo.
3 General Allenby.

Next letter 25th October 2017
These letters have been published as
Engaged in War – the Letters of Stanley Goodland 1914 – 1919
Twiga Books, ISBN 978 09528625 2 9 £9.50 + p&p
Available from http://twigabooks.co.uk/ or Amazon

Advertisements

So pent up with excitement…

[passed by censor No. 3983]
7 10 17
no address

My very dear old Elsie
Just a line to let you know I am quite safe and well –  In my last letter I think I told you that I was going to attempt a big thing – It was indiscreet of me perhaps to mention it to you but one gets so pent up with excitement that unless on these occasions one can confide in someone one would simply burst! The great event was a night raid and it came off very successfully last night. I will write you more about it in a day or two –  you will be glad to hear the Regiment has received many wires of congratulations today and I personally have had many kind words said to me by the General and my Colonel. The Colonel thinks we are going to be relieved almost  immediately for a rest and then he says I am to go to Cairo for a weeks leave and rest. I shall look forward to this. Many thanks dear girl for your letter received yesterday I am glad that the Doctor is back again and Mrs. Brown is better. Best love dear old girl

From Stan

Next letter 14th October 2017
These letters have been published as
Engaged in War – the Letters of Stanley Goodland 1914 – 1919
Twiga Books, ISBN 978 09528625 2 9 £9.50 + p&p
Available from http://twigabooks.co.uk/ or Amazon

Fat and flourishing…

Sept 9 1917
no address

My dear old Elsie
Heres another line to tell you I am quite safe and fit. Ill enclose a snap taken the other day when were out of the old trenches –  Im sure I look fat & flourishing enough dont I? lye very little news to tell you every day here is much the same as the next –  We get shelled every morning and evening but weve excellent trenches — two nights ago we had a bad time but my fellows have been splendid — Unfortunately there have been casualties but one must expect that – this week weve had 3 killed and 18 wounded – the people at home Im afraid will realize the 1/5 Somersets are really in service at last when they see the casualty lists come in. Damn this war I say – I hate to think this fine old Regiment of ours must suffer with the rest –  I hope next week we shall go out for a rest and if we can only get down by the sea again we shall be happy. I am as dirty as can be and the fleas have kept on biting and biting. Banes came to see me just now with Milsom – weve had a good pow-wow – poor Banes has just lost some of his best men and is so depressed about it. I think I told you dear girl I am to be Adjutant of the Regiment in a few weeks time Im awfully gratified and the Colonel has been so nice about it. It’s a big job on service I know but I shall do my ew-stan

damnedest. My name has gone in to the War Office for its got to go through the Gazette and my appointment will start on Oct 10th for 3 years but of course the war will be over long long before my term is up –  lets hope so anyway.1 Ill send you a snap shot one of my fellows took of me the other day – it surely speaks for itself and I hope you will realize how fit and flourishing I am Best love dear girl

 

 

from Stan

1 He served until June 2nd 1920.

Next letter September 26th 2017
These letters have been published as
Engaged in War – the Letters of Stanley Goodland 1914 – 1919
Twiga Books, ISBN 978 09528625 2 9 £9.50 + p&p
Available from http://twigabooks.co.uk/ or Amazon

The Mespot Commission has exposed…

August 1st 1917
No address

My dear old Elsie
The posts seem to have gone all wrong again for this is the third week no letter has come from you – perhaps those wretched submarines have been busy – Ive not written for about ten days because Ive been out on outpost duty again but now we are resting and under canvas and I can get back to my little camp bed. There is very little to tell you and there is a good deal of sameness about our days –  sometimes however there are raids carried out and there is always a certain amount of artillery fire and air activity – we are all longing to get further on but there are a good many difficulties to overcome first. The other day our General suggested we should get up some Brigade sports while we are resting and so last Saturday we had quite a gala day here in the desert we had managed to bring our band along with us – and they played all afternoon –  the Somersets beat the other Regiments of the Brigade in most of the events – weve got a very good tug of war team.

Ive been thinking of you dear girl on holiday and hoping you have had a very good time and real summer weather – you must have enjoyed seeing all your people and friends again. The last batch of home papers gave the report of the Mespot Commission1 – of course I am greatly interested and I am glad all the horrible things (or some of them) have now been exposed to the world. I could add a few more details – but I try to forget all my experiences out there. It seems ages and ages since we left England and here we are at the anniversary of the war again – whenever is it all going to end dear – we have had no news at all lately from the outside world and are very anxious about Russia – I wonder what people at home think about things especially as food seems so scarce and expensive wouldnt it be grand if we could wake up one morning and find Peace in the world once again. I hope dear girl that you are quite quite fit again – Every day I look out for your letters which I hope will soon come – with best love

from Stan

1 Report of Mesopotamia Commission issued June 1917 (Moberly, op. Cit. vol. IV, pp.28-31. Chairman of the Commission, Sir George Hamilton, wrote in a letter to The Times July 16th 1917 ‘Our investigation showed that never before had the rank and file of the British and Indian Armies fought better than in Mesopotamia. On the other hand it was difficult to exaggerate the incompetence shown in the management of their transport, supplies and medical services.’ Austen Chamberlain resigned as Secretary of State for India when the report was published.

Next letter August 14th 2017

These letters have been published as
Engaged in War – the Letters of Stanley Goodland 1914 – 1919
Twiga Books, ISBN 978 09528625 2 9 £9.50 + p&p
Available from http://twigabooks.co.uk/ or Amazon

It’s my birthday today, am I 33 or 34?

1/5 Somerset Li. Chakrata, Upper India
Sept. 22nd 1916

My dear old Elsie
It’s my birthday today and I can’t remember if I’m 33 or 34!1 Frank Calway kindly says I’m 34 but it doesn’t matter much does it – I feel younger than when I left England and if only I could get my ‘innards’ right I should be as fit as ever.

My poor old leg hurts like anything on wet days but I’m not a bit lame now and can run about at tennis and do long route marches without any trouble – Many thanks dear old girl for your last letter (Aug. 22nd) with birthday wishes – I wonder if by this time next year this horrid war will be over but I suppose that is too much to hope for – I’m trying to get reconciled to the feeling that it will be 1918 before I see you and dear old England again! I’m looking forward to meeting Harold about Oct 2nd – he is coming to Meerut on his way to Calcutta and Burma and I’ve got five days leave to go down to him and then have to return here – it will be so nice to see him again and we shall have simply heaps to talk about. It is difficult to get photos done in this country but in a week or so I really hope to send you a few snapshots. I almost despair of ever getting that M.C. they are so long in publishing despatches aren’t they but I haven’t quite given up hope yet! I saw one of the Mundens was killed – I think it must be Dr. Mundens  younger brother2 – Aren’t the casualty lists heartbreaking now? Cheerio and my best love
from Stan

Postscript:
Many thanks dear for the ‘Eve’ book – it is lovely & I’m always looking at it – the other fellows in the Mess love it too – Stan.

1 He was born in 1883, therefore was 33 on September 22nd 1916.
2 This name has not been traced.

Next letter Sep 28th 2016

These letters have been published as
Engaged in War – the Letters of Stanley Goodland 1914 – 1919
Twiga Books, ISBN 978 09528625 2 9 £9.50 + p&p
Available from http://twigabooks.co.uk/ or Amazon

This horrid old war…

Charleville Hotel, Mussoorie, C/o Cox & Co, Bombay
Aug. 4th 1916

My dear old Elsie
I have just returned from the Intercession Service1 at the Church – it has all been very impressive and the singing was led by the splendid band of the 7th. Hussars.

I suppose there are similar services today all over dear old England – it is hard to realize that this horrid old war has been raging for two whole years and at present I see no prospect of peace for many months to come. I must say it all makes me feel very sad and very homesick but I suppose it’s ones duty to keep smiling & present a bold front to the world, weve simply got to win this war and we shall need even yet all the smiles and bravery of Englishmen – and Englishwomen too – to accomplish it. I hate writing about the war but its hard to forget it and at the back of my mind always there is Mesopotamia and all we went through in those months of struggle to relieve Kut but I’ll try to write you of other things. Many thanks dear old thing for all your letters and Tatlers etc. – I am hearing from you regularly again now and besides I am getting a good many through from the Gulf – last week I actually got a letter and Tatler dated Nov. 24th. last year, these had obviously been in the Kut mail bags. I hope you have received the letters lve written you since I came back to India but Im afraid Im an uncertain letter writer – I always was wasn’t I? But I love your letters and they mean such a lot to me – sometimes I think I dont deserve all the love and thought you give me.

Today I have sent you by registered post a little lot of twelve skins – they are the skins of the Himalayan snow fox2 – I want you to have them made up when you feel inclined into a muff and stole thing but you must please let me pay for doing them up – probably you would find someone in Cheltenham to do this. These skins are scarce now so I hope youll like ‘em and I shall look forward to seeing you wearing them (not next winter I fear). You will be glad to hear I am ever so much stronger than when I last wrote and Im looking ever so fat and fit now my wound doesn’t trouble me at all but my inside is still quite hopeless – the doctor here says I must expect this for some time – the funny part about it is that this trouble doesn’t make me feel ill at all now and of course I am bound to be passed fit for service when I come up for my final Board in about 10 days time. I am still at Mussoorie but must leave for Chakrata in 3 days time – Capt Body left about 10 days ago and is I expect already at Basra but he left his wife here and a week ago Capt. Major & Lieut. Moore3 of the Somersets turned up from Meerut and persuaded me to stay on with them for a bit. I hope to see Harold if I go off to Mespot again from Bombay – my address will be
Capt E.S.Goodland
1/5 Buffs
Mesopotamia Expeditionary Force
c/o India Office, London

it is better to drop the Somerset LI. as it is confusing and we are no longer I.E.F.’D’ but M.E.F. I imagine you are on holiday now and hope you will have ever such a nice time and good weather- you deserve a long rest & change I am sure. This is a very jolly place and there is always plenty to do and everyone seems in the right holiday mood – I will tell you what lve been doing in my next – the mail goes out almost immediately and I dont want to miss it. Many thanks again dear for all your letters and papers – with best love and good wishes for your holiday
from Stan

1 On the second anniversary of the outbreak of the war.
4 Elsie never had these furs made up, but they survived until 2011 as collar and cuffs on her daughter’s coat.
3 Capt Major sailed for India with the Regiment in 1914. He died in the battle for El Jib in Palestine. The two Moore brothers (Thomas & RB) were also in the Regiment from 1914. They both survived the war (BaR pp.xill, 13, 73). They were brothers of Mary, wife of Capt later Lt-Col FD Urwick.

Next letter Aug 11th 2016

These letters have been published as
Engaged in War – the Letters of Stanley Goodland 1914 – 1919
Twiga Books, ISBN 978 09528625 2 9 £9.50 + p&p
Available from http://twigabooks.co.uk/ or Amazon

Yesterday, a ripping parcel arrived

1/5 Somerset LI., Chakrata, Upper Provinces, India
July 8 1916

My dear old Elsie
You will be pleased to know that I am ever so much better and am now right up in the Himalayas with the old Regiment I have had such a kind welcome from the Colonel1 down to the smallest private in my old company – they have given me such a swell dinner at the Mess and it is simply glorious being amongst the old Regiment again.

The Colonel says that now he’s got me he’s going to stick to me and has already applied to Simla2 for my return – I think I told you that my leave carries me on until Aug. 20th. and I shall not know what is going to happen to me until then. Everyone here thinks this Regiment is going on service to the Gulf in the autumn (the Colonel appears to have had some private information about this) – already all of the officers here have bought a lot of their field service kit – If this is so of course I should like nothing better than to go out again with them but I certainly do not want to loaf about India doing ordinary Regimental duty while there is a war on. The Colonel of the Buffs will be very sick too if I don’t go back to my adjutant’s job with him – but I shall have to wait and see until my orders come from Simla. I shall have to go before another board of doctors before my leave is up and they may not pass me fit for service again. At present my poor inside is altogether wrong – I suppose it will be some time before I can get over the effects of all the bad food and water I’ve had to live on for so many months. It is really beautiful up here – 8000 feet above sea level, to get here one has to take a motor ride of 60 miles for we are right in the heart of the Himalayas and in clear days the “everlasting snows” glisten in the distance and make one just look and wonder & think what a marvelous world we live in – I cant walk very far in these hilly parts yet but Frank Calway (with whom I am sharing quarters) lends me his pony and I just hack about enjoying the scenery and fresh air.

Well my dear old thing – it seems a long time since I had any letters from you but I am hoping in a few days, to hear from you direct through Cox – yesterday however a ripping parcel came from you which had been travelling all round the Gulf. It is so kind of you but you must promise me not to send me anything more until I go on service again but save your money for War Loan – the knife is just what I wanted & the diary too & the lighter & baccy all splendid – really it is too good of you old pal and I dont deserve it in the least.

To my surprise I had a wire from Harold yesterday saying that he was at Mhow at the Staff School – it is a long way from here but I quite hope we should be able to meet before he goes back to Burma.

The Mesopotamian campaign seems at a standstill just now – the weather is so awful that I think our force is quite unable to do much – I suppose they will wait until September. I saw the Russians who joined up with us about the middle of May and it was all very interesting– I noted that they are trying to fix the blame of the foolhardy Baghdad advance on to someones shoulders and personally I do not see how Sir John Nixon can explain away his entire lack of judgement! I am wondering if Leslie and Bert4 will have to join the colours and what the girls will do then it is very sad and all this upsetting of homes and peoples lives but it simply must be done if we are ever going to end this war successfully.

I am anxious to hear how the Pater is getting on now & hope everything goes all right at Elm Grove – he is enjoying the garden I expect & he always feels better in the warm weather

[unsigned]

1 Lt-Col Cooke-Hurle  DSO commanded the 1/5 Battalion Somerset Light Infantry throughout the war until ordered to report back to the War Office in February 1919
2 Himalayan Hill Station, summer capital of British India. The Viceroy and members of the Viceregal council with their staff retreated there from the heat of Delhi in the summer months. The name is also used as shorthand for Indian Army GHQ.
3 On May 20th a Russian Cossack patrol of 113 officers & men arrived at Ali Gharbi, after a march of 200 miles. They stayed a fortnight; their officers were awarded British Military Crosses (Moberly, op. Cit. vol. III p.13).
4 Leslie Hyde & Bert How, brothers-in-law to Stanley. Leslie was employed making munitions in Manchester.

Next letter Aug 4th 2016

These letters have been published as
Engaged in War – the Letters of Stanley Goodland 1914 – 1919
Twiga Books, ISBN 978 09528625 2 9 £9.50 + p&p
Available from http://twigabooks.co.uk/ or Amazon

At the height of my troubles…

[Note: address c/o Cox & Co. Bombay.]
Coluba Hospital, Bombay
June 10 1916

My dear old Elsie
I hope you wont think it very unkind of me not to have written to you for so long but I daresay you have been able to get news of me through my letters to Elm Grove but these I am afraid have not been very regular either. You will I know be glad to hear dear that I am practically well again now. I have had my Medical Board and tomorrow I set out on my journey north for two months leave (I think I had earned leave back to England but the Board thought the War Office at home would snap me up and not allow me to come East again so they kept me in India!) I shall go via Delhi and have a look at Indias great show place and then on to Meerut where half the old Regiment is stationed and then on to Chakrata (in the lower Himalayas) where the Colonel and Headquarters and the other half of the Regiment are stationed. I shall be able to spend a nice quiet time amongst old friends and shall soon regain my lost strength and the two stone in weight which I have entirely lost. I am afraid I did not write you very much (if at all) during April and the part of May I was at the front. April was a very dreadful month and I shall never forget it as long as I live night and day we were fighting to get to poor old Kut for we knew they were on their last legs – well old thing – we failed and it was the greatest disappointment of my life1 – I dont think anyone can ever realize how we tried and tried again against every conceivable difficulty – time after time we stood up to be shot at and attempted to storm almost impregnable enemy positions – added to these anxieties we were faced with a terrible cholera epidemic2 which I suppose people at home will never know about – twenty of my poor regiment went down in 36 hrs and not one recovered – the sights I saw were really heart-breaking – To my great regret our Brigadier General Rice who was a very good friend to me died of cholera a few days before I left the regiment – By the way – old thing – I am Captain now and it was really due to him that I was recommended for my third star. All I want to make me happy is my Military Cross  now – I do wonder if they are ever going to give it to me. I have heard once or twice from the Colonel of the Buffs and I am glad to say that he thinks the cholera is dying out but of course the heat and flies and myriad discomforts are very distressing – I was so sorry to leave them all and fought hard against this fever but it conquered me in the end and then jaundice set in and my whole skin went a delicate primrose colour – there are hundreds of cases of jaundice in the Gulf & the medical people say it is all brought on by bad water & food – it is a most depressing thing to get I can tell you.

About the middle of April when my troubles were at their height a most delightful parcel arrived from you – dear old thing – thank you ever so much. I wish I could tell you in words what pleasure it brought me, at that time I had come to my last pipe (which was one of a pair you gave me some time ago) I had unfortunately lost the mouthpiece of this and had made one with a bit of stick and a penknife which wasnt at all satisfactory – Imagine my delight when I discovered a pipe amongst my parcel & the little mascot too was splendid! The first few days of my illness I lived on your cocoa and soup tablets – even after nearly two years of war the Field Ambulances in Mesopotamia have simply nothing in the way of comforts and drugs. I hate to be always grumbling but really it is a disgrace – I only hope France is run better than Mesopotamia (but it surely must be) else we never even deserve to win the war – and what awful lies the newspapers print3 – why ever cant the British public be told the truth – some day perhaps Ill tell you all I know – but I daresay when peace comes and I am  in dear old England once again I shant want to talk about the war at all but just try to forget all this horrid time.

I must be patient until letters from England find me again – it is a long time since I had my last mail – some time in April 1 think – I do hope you are all well –
with best love

from Stan

1 Kut surrendered on April 29th after repeated & vain efforts for its relief.
2 There were 800 cases of cholera in the Tigris Corps during April & May (Moberly op. cit. vol. III p.9 footnote). Cholera was no respecter of rank.
3 Eye Witness complains ‘It is impossible to communicate freely with the outside world. Things were evidently going wrong and this fussy meddling supervision, this constant fear of anything discreditable leaking out, did not increase one’s confidence in the Higher Command’ (Edmund Candler, op. cit. vol. 1, p.65).

Next letter Jul 8th 2016

These letters have been published as
Engaged in War – the Letters of Stanley Goodland 1914 – 1919
Twiga Books, ISBN 978 09528625 2 9 £9.50 + p&p
Available from http://twigabooks.co.uk/ or Amazon

In the trenches – it is most depressing work

I.E.F. ‘D’
Mar 28 1916

My dear old Elsie

A few lines to tell you I am safe and sound and fairly well. I cant remember when I wrote last and there is really very little news to tell you for we are not allowed to say very much about the latest happenings in this country. I wonder what the home papers have told you. Thank goodness I came through the last fighting Mar 8 to 10 safely and since then we have been doing a spell in the trenches – it is a most depressing work and there is no rest for the poor adjutant. Now we are under canvas about 4000 yards behind the firing line and it is a real treat to get a shave and a wash and to take ones boots off. We are supposed to be resting but the whole force is busy preparing for the next great effort for Kut – it was a great disappointment to us that we did not get through on the 8th to 10th – it was a very near thing but it was necessary to get far away from the river and we were simply driven back from want of water and from fatigue. I am so sorry to say my mail has failed me again the last 3 weeks and I miss my letters ever so much but yesterday the parcel you so kindly sent of soap toothpaste tobacco and sweets arrived it came just at the right moment – thank you so much dear – you would have been amused to see me with a bucket of water and my piece of coal tar soap which is the envy of the officers mess – I feel cleaner now than I have for ages and for the time being I believe Ive got rid of most of the fleas and horrid things that have been biting me up lately. Im longing to get some home news again for I’m always wondering what is happening.

It may be some time again before I get a chance of writing but I hope you wont worry about me – if we could only get to Kut I think they would give the Brigade a long rest and possibly send us back to India – we have done more than our share and we are all tired out. My poor old leg gets inflamed and some days I am very lame but I dont want to give up until Kut is relieved – every one of us is wanted for that job. No news yet of the Military Cross but Ive great hopes for a few days ago the boys at Basra Headquarters wired up for my full Christian names – youll also be pleased to hear that the General has recommended me for temporary promotion to Captain so Im hoping in a little while to have 3 stars – it will mean a good deal extra pay and altogether will be very nice – not a word of all this until things are settled! Well cheerio dear old thing – theres a good time coming – or at least I keep on hoping so.

Best love

from Stan

 

Next letter Jun 10th 2016

These letters have been published as
Engaged in War – the Letters of Stanley Goodland 1914 – 1919
Twiga Books, ISBN 978 09528625 2 9 £9.50 + p&p
Available from http://twigabooks.co.uk/ or Amazon

I am all right except for two frost bitten toes

I.E.F ‘D’
Mar 5 1916

Dear old Elsie

Just a line to tell you I am all right except for two frost bitten toes. My wound is not troubling me a bit but I think I shall always be a little lame.

Your last letter was dated Jan 4th. and I have had no parcels at all so some day if only we can get to Kut and things smooth themselves out a little I shall have a big mail bag all to myself. I may not be able to write again for some time as we are just finishing preparations for another big advance1 – I only hope we shall be successful and that before this reaches you the news of the relief of Kut will be wired across the Empire. Everyone is keen and very anxious and I hope the luck that has been mine all through this fighting will stay with me. I cant remember dates now my mind is so busy with other things and so I’m so sorry I cant send you a birthday letter but I fancy the day wont be far off2 when this arrives so heres my most affectionate birthday wishes & greetings. We have lived through very exciting times lately – every day the guns are busy and there has been a lot of night work – sapping and bombing -, Its all very wearing and one needs cast iron nerves I can assure you.

lve had no home news since Dec 30th. but I fancy the Pater and the girls are carrying on most nobly and bravely – I look forward when these new battles are over and our object is accomplished to a good long rest – I feel Ive earned it! I long to get away somewhere quiet for a time – well – so long -old girl

Best love & every good wish

from Stan

1 The attack on the Dujailah Redoubt March 8th – 10th.
2 Elsie’s birthday was February 12th. This letter was a bit late!

 

Next letter Mar 28th 2016

These letters have been published as
Engaged in War – the Letters of Stanley Goodland 1914 – 1919
Twiga Books, ISBN 978 09528625 2 9 £9.50 + p&p
Available from http://twigabooks.co.uk/ or Amazon