No mail, very fed up

Feb 22 1917

My dear old Elsie
We’ve had no English mail for the last 3 weeks & consequently are very fed up – I suppose the submarines have been too busy or perhaps the mail boats are being sent round the Cape. We are all hoping 3 letters will come all together. I am wondering how you are now – in your last letter you told me that you were just recovering from a nasty touch of ‘flu – I do hope you are quite fit again & I shall be so anxious to know. We are still in camp and very little exciting happens – we’ve got a very energetic General who makes us do plenty of hard work but we don’t mind that because theres absolutely nothing else to do – On March 2nd the whole Division is going out on a reconnaissance over the Frontier and we are busy making all the preparations- we shall be away from this spot for 15 days about – it is very likely that we shall not be able to get any letters posted so you will know if you dont hear from me – there are of course no roads where we are going so we have to take camels to carry all our stores and kit. Nothing more has come to hand yet about our future but we think we shall get news before many days are over & everyone seems confident we are going to be sent away from India at the end of March or the beginning of April! Best love dear old girl

from Stan

Next letter March 1st 2017

These letters have been published as
Engaged in War – the Letters of Stanley Goodland 1914 – 1919
Twiga Books, ISBN 978 09528625 2 9 £9.50 + p&p
Available from http://twigabooks.co.uk/ or Amazon

Advertisements

I’ve been out in a blockhouse

Attock, India
Feb. 15 1917

My dear old Elsie
I’ve been out in a blockhouse on the front line since last I wrote to you with a detachment of 70 men of my Company – I hear the post goes in a few minutes so I thought I must send you a few lines. It’s been a very exciting week for me and now we are all dead tired and looking forward to a good days rest! I’m not allowed to say what’s happening out here but things are fairly peaceful and at any rate the Frontier is so well guarded just now that there isn’t much danger – We still hear very strong rumours that we are soon to go home and I really think you will see me before many weeks are over. The mail boats are very uncertain now and I haven’t had a letter from you for two weeks – I suppose the submarines are so busy in the Mediterranean now that mails will be delayed. I do hope you are much better now & entirely lost your ‘flu. Very little news here – I’m afraid my letters are very dull – but our lives now are simply spent in soldiering & soldiering all day long. I’m always thinking of you & dear old England
With best love

from Stan

Next letter February 22nd 2017

These letters have been published as
Engaged in War – the Letters of Stanley Goodland 1914 – 1919
Twiga Books, ISBN 978 09528625 2 9 £9.50 + p&p
Available from http://twigabooks.co.uk/ or Amazon

Glad to hear you are recovering…

[Letter addressed to ‘Highcroft’1]
1/5 Somerset L.I., Pir Gumat Shah, India N.W.
Feb 8 1917

My dear old Elsie
Very many thanks dear for your last letter dated Jan 9th and I am so glad you are getting over your ‘flue’ and are beginning to feel stronger – you must have had a very nasty illness and I hope you are getting a little Spring weather now & sunshine to help you get quite well. By this time I expect you will have moved into ‘Highcroft’ and I hope you are very comfortably settled – it is such a business to change houses as a rule. I havent much news this mail – we have had no orders yet regarding our future except that we break up this camp on March 17th and go somewhere. They will probably only give us a few days notice – we may go into blockhouses for the hot weather – or go to some Himalayan Hill station or there is the great chance still of going home. Im still Quartermaster of the Regiment and shall be glad to hand over in a few days – its a worrying job and I hate so much office work – Id much rather be out amongst my men.

Ive had several letters from Alice who seems much impressed by Burma and she is of course delightfully happy. Harold is lucky to be stationed in such a nice place as Maymyo & to have such a good job. We get papers 3 days late here and are at present wondering & wondering if America really intends to declare war on Germany.2
Best love dear old girl – and do keep well now

from Stan

1 The Brown family had moved to another house in Minchinhampton.
2 The USA declared war on Germany on April 6th 1917.

Next letter February 15th 2017

These letters have been published as
Engaged in War – the Letters of Stanley Goodland 1914 – 1919
Twiga Books, ISBN 978 09528625 2 9 £9.50 + p&p
Available from http://twigabooks.co.uk/ or Amazon

Sorry to hear you have flu…

Pir Gumat Shah, Attock District, North West Frontier, India
Feb 1st 1917

My dear old Elsie
I was so very sorry to hear in your last letter that you were in bed with ‘flu and feeling so dreadfully seedy – I do hope you have got over it long ago and that you are your cheery self again.

Its a beastly thing to get but the weather at home seems to have been very severe and I dont wonder at people feeling ill. Do take care of yourself – goodness knows how your little family gets on when you arnt well. Mrs. Brown started the letter quite well – why didnt you let her carry on a little more! Anyway I hope to come to see them all one day in the dim future – and this reminds me of some news which I hope will pass the Censor all right – weve heard on very high authority that many British Regiments are going to be sent to Europe in April – ourselves included. They are sending a whole lot of Garrison Battalions into this country now to take our place and everything seems to point to our going somewhere – Especially as the Frontier seems so quiet just now. We may go to Egypt and then Salonika1 or to England to refit for France – the latter I hope and trust. It seems quite certain that every white man possible will be wanted for the great push this coming summer. And so dear girl, you may see me sooner than ever you expected but you musnt count too much upon it for all orders change about a good deal.

Another thing I must tell you is that the Colonel has been asked by the War Office if he has any officers he can recommend for commissions as Captains in the Regular Army – the Colonel has very nicely selected me as the only one suitable in the Regt and of course I feel very flattered. Of course I dont want to leave the old Battalion again and the CO doesnt want to lose me but he says he feels that it his duty to put up my name if I am willing. I should probably have to stay in the Army a few months after peace is declared and perhaps this would suit me quite well for it will take the country some little time to settle down and for business to find its footing again. Anyhow the Colonel has given me a little time to think things over. If I got into the Regular Army I should certainly be sent home even if the Somersets remained in India.2 Since I last wrote the Regiment has arrived and we are quite comfortably settled down – every one was very pleased with all our arrangements and really the men I had with me worked splendidly. Im still Quartermaster and have plenty to do all day long – its been bitterly cold and theres lots more snow on the mountains which look simply glorious in the sunshine. Many thanks dear girl for the lovely mittens and tie – it was so nice of you and I wear the mittens every day and they are such a comfort to me – everyone in the mess is frightfully envious [jealous deleted] of them.

I am afraid that the Pater has had a very nasty turn and that Dr. Iles says a similar stroke may be fatal – of course he is getting a very old man now but I do hope he will live to see us home again and peace declared. I sometimes wonder if the Babe is equal to her most difficult task? Many thanks again dear for the mittens & tie and hopes that you are well again – with much love
from Stan

1 British and French forces were sent to Salonika in late 1915 to support Serbia, their ally, against Bulgaria which came in on the side of the Central Powers.
2 Stanley did not take up the offer.

Next letter February 8th 2017

These letters have been published as
Engaged in War – the Letters of Stanley Goodland 1914 – 1919
Twiga Books, ISBN 978 09528625 2 9 £9.50 + p&p
Available from http://twigabooks.co.uk/ or Amazon